Dragonfly Portraits




These are some of my dream shots!.. close-up shots of a dragonfly.
Really love to see the texture their compound eyes, thanks to Raynox MSN202!

  
These insects seen in close-up are really amazing!!

They have compound eyes that are capable of pinpointing the motion of a small prey insects several meters away, even while it is flying fast.

Maybe this is a male dragonfly, he has a hairy face... he needs to shave ha,ha!

This dragonfly is much bigger than the others above, you notice here that the texture of the compound eye looks more fine and not very visible



First time I shot a dragonfly close-up like this was more than 3 years  ago, and I was still using the reversed lens technique... and comparing now that I shoot using Raynox, it´s much easier and gives more satisfactory results.

Check my old photo: "Dragonfly Portrait" uploaded in Flickr few years back taken with my Nikon D40 + 18-55 mm kit lens in Reversed Lens Technique. Actually this is my most popular photo in Flickr!


Note: Click on the photos above to see the details in LARGE (FULLSCREEN) 

1) Camera: Nikon D90
2) Lens: Nikkor 55-200mm

The Raynox MSN-202 is good but not recommended if you are a beginner in macro photography because you need to get extremely close to your subject and generally it is resulting to a very shallow DOF.
Maybe it is more practical to try the Raynox DCR 250, so just click one of the below links:



Insect Macro: Green Lacewing


Here are some macro shots of a Green Lacewing which is approx. 10 mm long. 
During summer, these beautiful insects are usually attracted by the lights in our kitchen at night... it is the only time that I had an opportunity to take these macro shots, I never saw any lacewing when I go to the park during daytime.


The Green Lacewing has a long slender pale-green body and veined wings...

It also has long long delicate antennae...

The lacewing´s eye has  a golden color  but looks somewhat reddish here because it reflects from the background



Here is a Close-up showing the compound eye 

All the above photos were single shots taken with Nikon D90 + 55-200 mm kit lens + Raynox DCR250.

If want to know more info about Green Lacewing, check it from this link: Green Lacewing  or from Wikipedia/Lacewing

Note: Click on the photos above to see the details in LARGE (FULLSCREEN) 

1) Camera: Nikon D90
2) Lens: Nikkor 55-200mm

If you are interested to try the Raynox DCR 250, just click on the below links:

Why you need a Raynox macro lens:


If you want to try MACRO especially for shooting very small insects that are 10 mm or smaller in size and you find that macro lenses having 1:1 magnification are not just enough to capture the details, then I recommend you to try the RAYNOX_DCR-250  or RAYNOX_MSN-202 attached in front of the Nikkor 55-200mm
Of course you can always use the Raynox with the Micro Nikkor 85mm or the Micro Nikkor_105mm macro lenses but for me I found it more convenient to use the zoom lens because you can easily adjust by zooming in or out depending on the magnification power you need.
My favorite combination for shooting insects that are approx. 5mm - 10mm in size is the Nikkor 55-200mm +  RAYNOX_DCR-250 .

Here are some of my shots taken with this combination:



Treehopper (approx. 6 mm long)



Ant (approx. 7 mm long)


Winged ant (approx. 9 mm long)




Aphid (approx. 2 mm long)


See my other post for the photo of my camera setup here: Nikon D90 with Raynox 



Note: Click on the photos above to see the details in LARGE (FULLSCREEN) 

1) Camera: Nikon D90
2) Lens: Nikkor 55-200mm
4)  DIY Flash Diffuser


If you are interested to try the Raynox DCR 250, just click on the below links:





Insect Macro: Horse Fly


Below are some macro shots of a Horse-Fly taken using the Nikon D90 + Nikkor 55-200mm + RAYNOX_DCR-250


Horse-Fly with Compound Eye







Horse-Fly with Banded Eye


Whenever I intend to shoot macro, I always have with me the 3 Raynox diopters : DCR150, DCR250 & MSN202... and the one I used for the above shots was the DCR250.
Maybe you may ask why I selected to use the DCR250...
I already had the Raynox MSN202 but its very close focal distance (approx. 5 cm only!) did not permit me to use it in shooting with these insects... it is too close and they just fly away before getting the right focus. 
Even the DCR250 with a focusing distance of approx. 15 cm was even difficult to use, but with a lot of patience I was able to take some decent shots. 
Regarding the DCR150, which has approx. 30 cm focusing distance... well, it´s quite comfortable but it does not give enough magnification to get the details. I only use it when I want to shoot bigger insects or whenever it is not possible to get as close as 15 cm to the subject.

Note: Click on the photos above to see the details in LARGE (FULLSCREEN) 

1) Camera: Nikon D90
2) Lens: Nikkor 55-200mm

If you are interested to try the Raynox DCR 250, just click on the below links: